All Things Reconsidered

thenewenlightenmentage:

Checking the Claim: A Device That Translates Dolphin Sounds Into English
Researchers used new technology to interpret a dolphin noise they say translates loosely to “seaweed”
It isn’t too much of a stretch to think that dolphins, given their playful nature and charm, converse with each other much like we do. But is this really the case? And if so, to what extent do their seemingly random calls indicate a natural penchant for language?
Dolphin researcher Denise Herzing has spent nearly three decades listening in on suchnoises in hopes of deciphering what she suspects is actual dolphin chatter. But it wasn’t until she tried to teach the dolphins calls for specific English words—and they responded—that she realized she may have hit on something big.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Checking the Claim: A Device That Translates Dolphin Sounds Into English

Researchers used new technology to interpret a dolphin noise they say translates loosely to “seaweed”

It isn’t too much of a stretch to think that dolphins, given their playful nature and charm, converse with each other much like we do. But is this really the case? And if so, to what extent do their seemingly random calls indicate a natural penchant for language?

Dolphin researcher Denise Herzing has spent nearly three decades listening in on suchnoises in hopes of deciphering what she suspects is actual dolphin chatter. But it wasn’t until she tried to teach the dolphins calls for specific English words—and they responded—that she realized she may have hit on something big.

Continue Reading

— 4 days ago with 121 notes
fyeahwomenartists:

Alexis Hunter, artist, born 4 November 1948; died 24 February 2014
"I think feminism is too radical, even for liberalism."
I had the pleasure of meeting Alexis on a couple of occasions and always found her integrity and wit striking. A true feminist pioneer, her work, especially from the 1970s, seems radical even now, more than three decades on. The art world has lost a true icon. Heartbreakingly, not even a month after Alexis’ passing, her husband, Baxter, died of a broken heart.
This fitting obituary was written by my own professor, Lynda Morris, who curated Alexis’ 2006 acclaimed solo show, with accompanying book: 'Alexis Hunter: Radical Feminism in the 1970s'. (Well worth a read if you ever have the opportunity… it is still available to purchase!)
Image: Detail from Alexis Hunter’s Approach to Fear XIII: Pain – Destruction of Cause, 1977. 
Alison Humphrey

fyeahwomenartists:

Alexis Hunter, artist, born 4 November 1948; died 24 February 2014

"I think feminism is too radical, even for liberalism."

I had the pleasure of meeting Alexis on a couple of occasions and always found her integrity and wit striking. A true feminist pioneer, her work, especially from the 1970s, seems radical even now, more than three decades on. The art world has lost a true icon. Heartbreakingly, not even a month after Alexis’ passing, her husband, Baxter, died of a broken heart.

This fitting obituary was written by my own professor, Lynda Morris, who curated Alexis’ 2006 acclaimed solo show, with accompanying book: 'Alexis Hunter: Radical Feminism in the 1970s'. (Well worth a read if you ever have the opportunity… it is still available to purchase!)

Image: Detail from Alexis Hunter’s Approach to Fear XIII: Pain – Destruction of Cause, 1977. 

Alison Humphrey

— 3 weeks ago with 135 notes

discoverynews:

First Asteroid Discovered Sporting a Ring System

When you think of a celestial ring system, the beautiful ringed planet Saturn will likely jump to mind. But for the first time astronomers have discovered that ring systems aren’t exclusive to planetary bodies — asteroids can have them too. Read more

It’s a big breaking news day for space!

— 3 weeks ago with 1111 notes
Researchers Identify Gene That Helps Fruit Flies Go to Sleep →

neurosciencestuff:

A novel protein may explain how biological clocks regulate human sleep cycles

image

In a series of experiments sparked by fruit flies that couldn’t sleep, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a mutant gene — dubbed “Wide Awake” — that sabotages how the biological clock sets the…

(Source: hopkinsmedicine.org)

— 1 month ago with 118 notes
"Gluten Sensitivity" May Be a Misnomer for Distinct Illnesses to Various Wheat Proteins →

As doctors continue to tease apart the diverse ways that the human body reacts to all the proteins and other molecules besides gluten that are found in grains, they will be able to develop more accurate tests for various sensitivities to those compounds. Ultimately clinicians hope such tests will help people who have a genuine medical condition to avoid the specific constituents of grains that make them ill and will stop others from unnecessarily cutting out nutrient-dense whole grains.”

(Source: rhamphotheca)

— 1 month ago with 31 notes

I want to go to Alaska right now! These photos were taking by Canadian photographer and musician Tyler Forest-Hauser. He captures light within the atmosphere and across landscapes with such precision, the results are breathtaking. Other works found here: http://tylerforesthauser.com/

Also on his website; an interactive page he calls a “free for all” that lets you edit photos and use for your own work of art! Very cool.

(Source: greaterland, via ourwildways)

— 3 months ago with 113190 notes
#Tyler Forest-Hauser  #Alaska  #landscape photography  #Tylerforesthauser_freeforall  #beautiful  #landscape  #photography 
neuromorphogenesis:

It’s a New Year, So Here Are 8 Things to Blow Your Mind
2014 is upon us! Why not start the year off with a little awe? After all, it can make us better people. Here is a round-up of some interesting tidbits about our own psychology and physiology that should do the trick.
1. Why We Get Chills in Response to Music
Music is a human universal, but the ways in which it affects people is quite varied and highly dependent on personality type. While you may often get involuntary “chills”—otherwise known by their medical name, cutis anserina—in response to your favorite melodies, 8% of the population, according to a recent study, knows no such sensation. Core personality metrics like extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, neuroticism, and openness to experience were measured, and of all these dimensions, only openness to experience was related to feeling chills. People high in openness tend to be creative, curious about many things and have active imaginations. Bonus: If you are in fact prone to music-induced goosebumps you probably also receive them in response to other mediums—movies, paintings, landscapes, magazines… you name it!
2. Why Our Fingers Prune Up After Long Exposure to Rain, the Ocean, and Hot Tubs
Ask people why they suspect their fingers and toes prune up after extended soaks in the jacuzzi and you’re bound to get some interesting hypotheses. Osmosis, dehydration, the effects of minerals (or chlorine) on the skin. The truth is far more interesting, and we have Charles Darwin to thank. After prolonged time spent in a wet environment, our fingers and toes develop “treads” to enhance grip and traction. It’s a rainy day adaptation that would have likely proven very useful in the time when we were shoeless and swinging from branches.
3. Why Your Furniture Could Be Hurting Your Relationship
In a fascinating experiment, individuals who sat at a wobbly chair and table predicted that celebrity couples were more likely to dissolve. When people using stable furniture were asked to evaluate the same relationships, their outlooks were markedly more positive. This study sheds light on an important but often overlooked psychological truth: our environment can have a profound effect on the quality of our thoughts—in ways we have yet to even measure—so we should be discerning and curate them accordingly.
4. Your Ex is Cocaine for Your Brain
As opposed to our innate drive for friendship, which serves a relatively higher-order evolutionary purpose, our drive for love—which evolved as a means to reproduction—is fairly simple. The Economist highlighted a study which showed that a “relatively small area of the human brain is active in love, compared with that involved in, say, ordinary friendship.” Indeed, the sensation of being in love is primarily a “gut feeling”, manufactured in the brain by the same regions which generate the euphoria induced by drugs—like cocaine. “So the brains of people deeply in love do not look like those of people experiencing strong emotions, but instead like those of people snorting coke,” says Dr. Larry Young, a researcher into social attachment at Emory University.
5. Why Sex Isn’t Disgusting
Arousal, a sensation meant to facilitate sex, and ultimately reproduction, and disgust, an evolutionary defense mechanism to prevent disease, would seem at odds with one another. However, thanks to billions of years of our ancestors shrugging off the nasty in favor of, well, the nasty, sensitivity to both now cohabitates in that wonderful brain of ours. An article published by Dutch psychologists recently have come up with an explanation: “Saliva, sweat, semen and body odours are among the strongest disgust elicitors. This results in the intriguing question of how people succeed in having pleasurable sex at all. One possible explanation could be that sexual engagement temporarily reduces the disgust eliciting properties of particular stimuli or that sexual engagement might weaken the hesitation to actually approach these stimuli.”
6. Why Movies are Like Dreaming While Awake
Jonah Lehrer, pre-plagarism scandal, wrote that from the perspective of your brain, dreaming and movie-watching are strangely parallel experiences. If this is the case, watching a movie in a darkened theater may be closest one can get sleep with open eyes. It turns out that with the combination of audio and visual stimulation—what’s known to psychologists as “sensorimotor processing—a part of the brain that is associated with analysis and self-awareness goes dark as well. Scientists argue that such “inactivation” of this region, otherwise known as the prefrontal cortex, is what, thankfully, allows us to lose ourselves in the movie. Attention, Hollywood: this does not explain 2013’s After Earth. We were just lost.
7. Social Rejection—Bad For a Friday Night, Good For Creativity?
Recent studies have shown that the experience of social rejection, however unpleasant it may feel, may actually promote creative thinking for some. For people with a highly independent self-concept (psychojargon for those that view themselves as separate from others and value personal over group goals), not getting past that velvet rope actually reinforce feelings of distinctiveness and increase creativity by helping said social victim to recruit ideas from unusual places in the brain.
8. Your Breath Reveals a Lot More Than What You Had For Dinner
Blood tests and other invasive forms of medical diagnosis may soon be a thing of the past. Doctors are now using breath tests to uncover not only liver and kidney disorders, but also asthma, diabetes, tuberculosis, gastrointestinal infections—even the rejection of transplanted organs—by analyzing biomarkers in exhaled breath. “Anything you can have a blood test for, there is potentially a breath test for, as long as there is a volatile component,” says Raed A. Dweik, director of the pulmonary vascular program at the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute. In fact, breath tests actually exceed blood tests in accuracy for detecting certain types of cancers, particularly tumors of the lung.

Very interesting!

neuromorphogenesis:

It’s a New Year, So Here Are 8 Things to Blow Your Mind

2014 is upon us! Why not start the year off with a little awe? After all, it can make us better people. Here is a round-up of some interesting tidbits about our own psychology and physiology that should do the trick.

1. Why We Get Chills in Response to Music

Music is a human universal, but the ways in which it affects people is quite varied and highly dependent on personality type. While you may often get involuntary “chills”—otherwise known by their medical name, cutis anserina—in response to your favorite melodies, 8% of the population, according to a recent study, knows no such sensation. Core personality metrics like extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, neuroticism, and openness to experience were measured, and of all these dimensions, only openness to experience was related to feeling chills. People high in openness tend to be creative, curious about many things and have active imaginations. Bonus: If you are in fact prone to music-induced goosebumps you probably also receive them in response to other mediums—movies, paintings, landscapes, magazines… you name it!

2. Why Our Fingers Prune Up After Long Exposure to Rain, the Ocean, and Hot Tubs

Ask people why they suspect their fingers and toes prune up after extended soaks in the jacuzzi and you’re bound to get some interesting hypotheses. Osmosis, dehydration, the effects of minerals (or chlorine) on the skin. The truth is far more interesting, and we have Charles Darwin to thank. After prolonged time spent in a wet environment, our fingers and toes develop “treads” to enhance grip and traction. It’s a rainy day adaptation that would have likely proven very useful in the time when we were shoeless and swinging from branches.

3. Why Your Furniture Could Be Hurting Your Relationship

In a fascinating experiment, individuals who sat at a wobbly chair and table predicted that celebrity couples were more likely to dissolve. When people using stable furniture were asked to evaluate the same relationships, their outlooks were markedly more positive. This study sheds light on an important but often overlooked psychological truth: our environment can have a profound effect on the quality of our thoughts—in ways we have yet to even measure—so we should be discerning and curate them accordingly.

4. Your Ex is Cocaine for Your Brain

As opposed to our innate drive for friendship, which serves a relatively higher-order evolutionary purpose, our drive for love—which evolved as a means to reproduction—is fairly simple. The Economist highlighted a study which showed that a “relatively small area of the human brain is active in love, compared with that involved in, say, ordinary friendship.” Indeed, the sensation of being in love is primarily a “gut feeling”, manufactured in the brain by the same regions which generate the euphoria induced by drugs—like cocaine. “So the brains of people deeply in love do not look like those of people experiencing strong emotions, but instead like those of people snorting coke,” says Dr. Larry Young, a researcher into social attachment at Emory University.

5. Why Sex Isn’t Disgusting

Arousal, a sensation meant to facilitate sex, and ultimately reproduction, and disgust, an evolutionary defense mechanism to prevent disease, would seem at odds with one another. However, thanks to billions of years of our ancestors shrugging off the nasty in favor of, well, the nasty, sensitivity to both now cohabitates in that wonderful brain of ours. An article published by Dutch psychologists recently have come up with an explanation: “Saliva, sweat, semen and body odours are among the strongest disgust elicitors. This results in the intriguing question of how people succeed in having pleasurable sex at all. One possible explanation could be that sexual engagement temporarily reduces the disgust eliciting properties of particular stimuli or that sexual engagement might weaken the hesitation to actually approach these stimuli.”

6. Why Movies are Like Dreaming While Awake

Jonah Lehrer, pre-plagarism scandal, wrote that from the perspective of your brain, dreaming and movie-watching are strangely parallel experiences. If this is the case, watching a movie in a darkened theater may be closest one can get sleep with open eyes. It turns out that with the combination of audio and visual stimulation—what’s known to psychologists as “sensorimotor processing—a part of the brain that is associated with analysis and self-awareness goes dark as well. Scientists argue that such “inactivation” of this region, otherwise known as the prefrontal cortex, is what, thankfully, allows us to lose ourselves in the movie. Attention, Hollywood: this does not explain 2013’s After Earth. We were just lost.

7. Social Rejection—Bad For a Friday Night, Good For Creativity?

Recent studies have shown that the experience of social rejection, however unpleasant it may feel, may actually promote creative thinking for some. For people with a highly independent self-concept (psychojargon for those that view themselves as separate from others and value personal over group goals), not getting past that velvet rope actually reinforce feelings of distinctiveness and increase creativity by helping said social victim to recruit ideas from unusual places in the brain.

8. Your Breath Reveals a Lot More Than What You Had For Dinner

Blood tests and other invasive forms of medical diagnosis may soon be a thing of the past. Doctors are now using breath tests to uncover not only liver and kidney disorders, but also asthma, diabetes, tuberculosis, gastrointestinal infections—even the rejection of transplanted organs—by analyzing biomarkers in exhaled breath. “Anything you can have a blood test for, there is potentially a breath test for, as long as there is a volatile component,” says Raed A. Dweik, director of the pulmonary vascular program at the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute. In fact, breath tests actually exceed blood tests in accuracy for detecting certain types of cancers, particularly tumors of the lung.

Very interesting!

(via science-junkie)

— 3 months ago with 3556 notes
#science  #psychology  #physiology  #2014 

jtotheizzoe:

What if all the ice melted?

The ocean holds most of Earth’s water. After that, it’s ice. 5.7 million cubic miles of the stuff.

What if, thanks to natural and man-made climate change, it all melted? What if, by burning enough deep-Earth carbon (dead dinosaurs, prehistoric plants, or as we call it… fossil fuels) we raised Earth’s average temperature to around 80˚ F?

Thanks to National Geographic we know: This is is what 216 feet (66 meters) of sea level change looks like. 

— 4 months ago with 3758 notes

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Hesitate // Activate // Deviate by Alexa Meade & Sheila Vand

This may be the best artistic manifestation of a milk bath since Annie Leibovitz’ epic portrait of Whoopi Goldberg.

Innovative photographer Alexa Meade teamed up with performance artist Sheila Vand for a dairy-filled art experiment.

Read More

This is incredible!

— 4 months ago with 3365 notes
The 13 Best Art and Design Books of 2013 →

Imaginative maps, illuminating infographics, literary cats, vintage Soviet propaganda, Gertrude Stein’s favorite objects, and other treats for eye and spirit.

(Source: explore-blog)

— 4 months ago with 96 notes

ianbrooks:

Black Dancer by Davide Calluori

Artist: Behance
— 5 months ago with 7684 notes

Henry Kaiser ensemble ruling my life rn #namelesssound (at 14 Pews)

— 5 months ago
#namelesssound 

nutopiancitizen:

Death | Keep On Knocking

Just watched this documentary last night. Recommended for inspiration.

(Source: bionic-byronic-hero)

— 5 months ago with 142 notes